Versailles Park

The regular park of the Versailles Palace is one of the largest and most significant in Europe. It consists of many terraces, which decrease as they move away from the palace. Flowerbeds, lawns, greenhouses, pools, fountains, as well as numerous sculptures are the continuation of palace architecture. In the park of Versailles there are also several small palace-like structures. When decorating here used larch bark.

Versailles. Part 2. Park

Versailles. Part 2. Park

1. As soon as we left the palace to the park, we immediately turned left to look at the amazing Orangery.

Versailles. Part 2. Park

2. Built by Jules Ardouin-Mansart, it includes a winter part - a covered central gallery 150 meters long with side galleries located under the stairs, and a summer one - 6 figured flower beds and a round pond in the center. In the summer, about 1000 trees in tubs are arranged along flowerbeds, and in winter they are brought back into the gallery. Some orange trees from Portugal, Spain and Italy, as well as lemon and pomegranate trees from around the world are over 200 years old. Behind the Orangery, separated by the road San Cyrus, is the Swiss Ornamental Lake.Excavated to decorate the north-south axis, it was used as a stage for marine performances under the pre-revolutionary regime (until 1789). This large body of water replaced the swampy area known as the “stinking pond”, which was the source of numerous diseases among the inhabitants of Versailles.

Versailles. Part 2. Park

3. Then they returned to the main axis of the park to begin their journey along the Grand Canal.

Versailles. Part 2. Park

4. There are many ways to navigate the Versailles Park: by bike, on a golf cart, on foot, by boat, or on such a tram.

Versailles. Part 2.A park

5. All these amenities exist there, because the park is spread over a vast territory and it is impossible to inspect it on foot in one day. We were in Versailles from about 10 am to 7 pm and managed to watch a very small part of it. Of the vehicles used only the boat. Here is our route:

Versailles. Part 2. Park

6. The palace and the canal were built specifically oriented to the west so that in the evening the setting sun, reflecting in the Grand Canal, would turn it into a luminous axis of the park, going straight to the horizon. The axial composition, strict symmetry, regularity - the principles of classicism, which were laid in the foundation of the park by its designer, architect Andre Lenotrom. He used a clear, open layout, but at the same time applied a variety of optical effects.For example, in the direction from the palace along the canal, the size of the planning modules increases, while the detailing and saturation decreases (the partners in front of the palace, then the bosquets, and finally the arrays of free-growing greenery), which creates a feeling of increasing spatial scale. Work on the device park took 40 years. In the place of flower beds, fountains, the Grand Canal and the Orangery there were swamps, forests and meadows. The artificial leveling of the landscape required tremendous earthworks. Trees were brought in carts from all over France. Thousands of people, sometimes whole military regiments took part in this enterprise. Down the stairs, we turned into a Dauphin bosquet.

Versailles. Part 2. Park

7. While getting to the canal, we were wet by the rain. The weather changed every half hour.

Versailles. Part 2. Park

8.

Versailles. Part 2. Park

9. After waiting for the rain in the cafe, filled with soaked tourists, we climbed onto the ship, and the captain headed for the right sleeve of the channel.

Versailles. Part 2. Park

10. The Grand Canal is the most original creation of Lenotra, which turned the east-west axis into a long, flooded water surface. The canal was built during 11 years (1668-1679). Its length is 1670 meters. There were countless maritime performances with many sea and river vessels.In summer, the royal fleet walked along the canal, and in winter it became an ice rink. In 1674, Venice sent as a gift to the king two gondolas and four gondoliers, who were lodged in small houses at the head of the canal, which have since been called Little Venice.

Versailles. Part 2. Park

11. In the deserted right sleeve we were surrounded by a group of locals. They were waiting for us bread or other yummy as a sign of wagging their tails and biting empty hands.

Versailles. Part 2. Park

12.

Versailles. Part 2. Park

13.

Versailles. Part 2. Park

14. After the next rain and at the very close we landed on land and hurried into the possession of Maria Antunetta. There we were met by a luxurious tree.

Versailles. Part 2. Park

15. Behind him is the residence of the queen - Little Trianon.

Versailles. Part 2. Park

16.

Versailles. Part 2. Park

17. It was built by order of Louis XV for one of his favorites, but after King Louis XVI ascended the throne, he was presented to his wife, Marie Antoinette. Subsequently, without the permission of the queen, no one, not even the king himself, could step into her possession. The palace, designed by Ange-Jacques Gabriel, is a model of the transition from Rococo to a more tranquil neoclassicism. All four of its facade - different, decorated in the latest "architectural" fashion elements, inspired by the Greek temples. The building consists of three floors.From the first to the second floor there is the Great Staircase, the hall of which is luxuriously decorated with green southern Italian and marble white and veined. In the picture of a gilded wrought fence, the initials of Marie Antoinette dominate.

Versailles. Part 2. Park

18. Second floor - queen's apartments.

Versailles. Part 2. Park

19. Attic floor-rooms of the king. The servants were located on the mezzanine, and everything was designed to minimize their intersection with the inhabitants of the palace. Leaving the palace, we were in the English garden. Artificially created Rock and Grotto, surrounded by pines, larches, fir and juniper bushes resemble the landscapes of Switzerland. They were created with great difficulty over 4 years. Like everything around marked queen affiliation. For example, resting in a secluded place on a moss-covered bench, she could see people approaching from a distance and, if necessary, avoid uninvited guests, leaving the grotto along a narrow staircase.

Versailles. Part 2. Park

20.

Versailles. Part 2. Park

21. Above the lake is the octagonal Belvedere in plan. Its facade is decorated with magnificent reliefs: fruit garlands on friezes, platbands, symbolizing the seasons, the motives of gardening and hunting on the gables. Inside the floor is lined with marble mosaic, and the walls are decorated with elegant ornaments.

Versailles. Part 2. Park

22The Belvedere overlooks the Temple of Love.

Versailles. Part 2. Park

23. English Garden goes to the Anglo-Chinese, and after him - the queen's farm.

Versailles. Part 2. Park

24. Running away from the bustle of the royal court, Marie Antoinette wanted to create a quiet corner where she could feel all the delights of country life. So there was a farm with 11 houses scattered on the shore of the Big Lake in the spirit of the Normandy village. Five of them were intended for use by the queen and her guests: the royal house, the billiard room, boudoir, mill and cheese factory. Another four houses worked peasants. These are the Farm and its extensions, the Barn, the Creamery and the Dovecote. The farm was on the sidelines and served as a shelter for various domestic animals - a small herd of 8 cows and a bull, 10 goats and pigeons. One of the houses was used to warm up dishes, which were then served to the table of the queen. And the last building - the Marlborough Tower - a kind of lighthouse, was the place of departure of fishing boats on the Big Lake. Each house had a small vegetable garden in which artichokes, Savoy and cauliflower grew. These gardens were surrounded by a hedge of hornbeam and chestnut trees. Small orchards of apple and cherry trees were also laid out.The walls of the buildings were covered with creeps. The fences of stairs, galleries and balconies were decorated with white and blue ceramic pots with geraniums, hyacinths and other flowers. Later, for the royal children, they installed a garden swing and made a playground for bowls.

Versailles. Part 2. Park

25.

Versailles. Part 2. Park

26. Again, a local resident wants to help stray travelers.

Versailles. Part 2. Park

27. Unfortunately, we didn’t get into the Grand Trianon at all. He remained for us an abandoned Greek temple in the sunset rays.

Versailles. Part 2. Park

28.

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