Rules of life. Jack Daiking

“I was a journalist, so I attach special importance to the content of the image: it must simultaneously influence the viewer and give information. My work is connected with the protection of nature, and I want my works to transfer viewers to where few people are, ”today the Pulitzer Prize winner for artistic photography Jack Dieking is sharing his thoughts on photography in the“ Rules of Life ”section. His works are published in the magazines Arizona Highways and National Geographic. He has released nine books in the protection of the environment, and now the publishing house “Myth” publishes Jack’s book in Russian “Magic frame” - we advise anyone who wants to learn from the masters of their craft!

“Why do some images attract particular attention?In a good snapshot, the photographer, by arranging the elements, “lays” the direction of movement of the gaze and the emotional reaction of the viewer (although this is not always obvious). The photographer carefully builds a composition to convey his vision and help the viewer to look at the object in the same way.
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Dixie Forest Reserve, Utah, October 2012
Camera: Nikon D800E
Lens (tilt-shift): NIKKOR PC-E 24mm f / 3.5D ED
Aperture: f / 16
Exposure: 1/3
ISO: 100
Everyone likes to photograph the unusual.Imagine that you are driving in the desert, where only the strongest plants survived. And now imagine my feelings when I went to such places after an unusually rainy spring. Sonoran Desert was buried in color. My pulse increased, I breathed deeply the smell of spring. I immediately wanted to share this landscape.
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Badwater, Death Valley National Park, California, March 2010
Camera: Nikon D3x
Lens (tilt-shift): PC-E Micro-NIKKOR 45mm f / 2.8D ED
Aperture: f / 13
Exposure: 1/15
ISO: 100
Assembly of 10 vertical frames
When I decide to take a picture, my first task is to examine the object.I analyze everything that I see, and am looking for, from what would make up the narrative characterizing the object. I make several decisions about every possible snapshot - in other words, “pay homage to the object.” If I plan to remove a high mountain, I think vertically, and if the salt pits in Death Valley are horizontal.
The secret of a good photo is to spare no time in watching.In words, it is easy, but you need to teach the eye to see the nuances in shades, compositions and imperfections.
My friend Jay Dyusar likes to repeat: "We impose a rectangle on the landscape."We decide what to put in this rectangle, and what to leave behind the frame. This is our canvas to create a masterpiece. You can always find what is worth capturing. You need to choose an interesting detail and decide how best to beat it.
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Arches National Park, Utah, April 2010
Camera: Nikon D3X
Lens: AF-S NIKKOR 70-300mm f / 4.5-5.6G VR
Aperture: f / 13
Exposure: 1/4
ISO: 100
Focal length: 116 mm
Assembly of 11 vertical frames
Once, in the south of Utah, in the depths of the canyons of the Escalante River, I discovered a wonderful sight:a scattering of sunflowers stretching out from under the pink sand. I was fascinated by the high cliffs with dark brilliant “desert tan”, the struggle for life in quicksand. And I captured the landscape as it is.
But I knew that actually made me stop:the struggle for the survival of the flower, half covered with sand. Capturing the landscape like this, I made all the elements of the image equally significant. If I couldn’t decide what was important, was it worth hoping that the viewer would understand? I changed the angle, approached and simplified the image. I emphasized the diagonal of the stem and thus straightened the composition.As Leonardo da Vinci said: “Simplicity is the highest form of refinement.”
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Lake O’Higgins, Chile, February 2010
Camera: Nikon D3X
Lens: AF-S NIKKOR 70-300mm f / 4.5-5.6G VR
Aperture: f / 18
Exposure: 1/4
Focal length: 165 mm
Assembly of four vertical frames
Usually popular photographers are good illusionists.But not at all cheaters. Rather, they learned to shoot so that two-dimensional objects seemed three-dimensional to the viewer. By giving the image volume using light and shadow, textures and the correct focal length, they can set the direction in which the eye moves. That feeling of depth is a sign of good photography.
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Tamualipas, Mexico, October 2003
Camera: Arca-SwissF-Field 4 × 5
Lens: NIKKOR SW 75mm f / 4.5S
Aperture: f / 45
Exposure: 2
ISO: 50
Film: Fuji Velvia
Sometimes it’s not enough to create a perfect snapshot of a couple of days.I worked on this photo for about two weeks. I searched for whole days until I found a few plants with lowered stems. Then I watched the morning light play on each of them, until I decided to photograph it. I liked how the cactus in the foreground framed the escape in the background. Every day I took a stepladder and before dawn went to visit my new "friend." I assumed that one day all the flowers on the cactus will bloom simultaneously.But everything went wrong: every night new buds were blooming, and the old Väli. All week I watched the flowering: either one flower, then two or three. Finally, one day, an inflorescence of eight flowers appeared in the foreground. And, as I wanted, the landscape was lit by warm morning light.
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Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona, August 2006
Camera: Arca-Swiss F-Field 4 × 5
Lens: NIKKOR-T 720mm f / 16 ED
Aperture: f / 45
Exposure: 5
ISO: 50
Film: Fuji Velvia
Many landscape photographers say that light is the main thing.He paints the world and works wonders even with familiar things. It can create an extraordinary atmosphere. Its possibilities do not cause doubts, however sometimes I feel that magic is in the air, and I get lost and I cannot capture it. Often conflicting feelings seize me: the desire to observe and transmit magic in the frame. When I see such a light and incredible compositions come to my mind, I feel that I had the special honor and feel pleasure. At such moments I especially want to create.
Photographers get up before dawn and work in the cold.As a reward for their resilience, they are able to capture fleeting phenomena. This picture shows how the rising sun of New Mexico gives a littleThe ice-covered lake has a divine radiance and marks the migration: Canadian cranes in the Bosque del Apache nature reserve rise with the sun. The main merit in creating unforgettable pictures with such subjects belongs to the backlight. He emphasizes the silhouettes of birds that soar in a rising golden mist.
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Bosque del Apache National Wildlife Park, New Mexico, November 2010
Camera: Nikon D3S
Zoom lens: 200–400 mm with 1.4 teleconverter (550 mm)
Aperture: f / 10
Exposure time: 1/1000
ISO: 1600
The word "splendor" is used so often that its meaning has already been erased.The word "beauty" is also used too often. The view on the edge of the land at Cape Royal in the north of Grand Canyon Park is impressive. But there are not enough words to describe the beauty of the golden thundery sky illuminated by powerful flashes. It `s Magic! Therefore, it is worth capturing this greatness. We are trying, as a rule in vain, to show others how we felt when nature spoke to our soul. We can not capture the moment when the hair on the head stand on end. But we rejoice at these moments and do not abandon our attempts.
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Grand Canyon National Park, Cape Royal, Arizona, October 1990
Camera: Arca-Swiss F-Field 4 × 5
Lens: NIKKOR 500mm f / 8C
Aperture: f / 32
Exposure: 3
ISO: 50
Film: Fuji Velvia
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National Park “Hawaiian Volcanoes”, Hawaii, August 2010
Camera: Nikon D3X
Lens (tilt-shift): NIKKOR PC-E 24mm f / 3.5D ED
Aperture: f / 10
Exposure: 30
ISO: 100
Assembly of two frames
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Saguaro National Park, Arizona, May 1991
Camera: Arca-Swiss F-Field 4 × 5
Lens: NIKKOR SW 75mm f / 4.5S
Aperture: f / 49
Exposure: 12
ISO: 50
Film: Fuji Velvia
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Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, September 2012
Camera: Nikon D800E
Lens: AF-S NIKKOR 70-300mm f / 4.5-5.6G VR
Aperture: f / 13
Exposure: 1/40
ISO: 100
Focal length: 170 mm
Assembly of six vertical frames
Screenshot 2017-05-12 at 16.59.17.pngVermilion Cliffs National Park, Arizona, April 1992


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